Event Logs – slide 2

And in the extraction phase, you decide what data to include to create an event log. In this lecture, I’ll first explain what an event log is, and what the ingredients are, and what the structure is of an event log, such that later on you know what data to include in an event log Read More …

Event Logs – slide 3

So as I’ve shown you in earlier lectures, event data is everywhere. And it’s been recorded in many shapes and forms, so usually you don’t get an event log on a silver plate, you have to transform it. And therefore, you have to recognize how to get the right data attributes and put it in Read More …

Event Logs – slide 5

And this trace can contain a lot of different attributes. For instance, of course, the card number, but also that it is a prepaid card. For this card, as I said, several events are recorded. And as I’ve shown you before, for instance, when did you buy the card, and when did your check in Read More …

Event Logs – slide 6

What are event log ingredients? You have a case, and this case can have a description, for instance. And other attributes, as I said before, the card number, the type of card, et cetera, et cetera. And for a particular case, you record several events, what happened, when did it happen, who did what, and Read More …

Event Logs – slide 7

To be able to store all this, we started the XES or Extensible Event Stream event log format, which exactly records traces of sequences of events. So a trace usually has one attribute always that’s the concept semicolon name. So every trace has an attribute called concept semicolon name that indicates the name of this Read More …

Event Logs – slide 8

However, you usually don’t get your data already in an event log format. So you usually get data in a tabular form like this. You have several columns. And in this example, the first column is, for instance, the card ID. The second column, the action, what happened. The third column, the time stamp. The Read More …

Event Logs – slide 9

So to recap, event logs are recorded usually in the XES event log format, that’s what ProM works with. An XES event log consists of traces, and a trace consists of events. The trace can have a name and other attributes. And each event has a name, the timestamp when it happened, the resource that Read More …

Event Logs – slide 10

So, now you know the key ingredients of an event log, and this will help you in the extraction phase. Don’t worry, however, in later lectures, we will cover this in a bit more detail. But now you know what key ingredients there are to be expected in an event log. Hope to see you Read More …